Social changes

I’m studying and need help with a History question to help me learn.

 

Prepare: Read Chapters 7, 8 and 9 of the textbook. Find a primary source from the 1920s that is related to the group that you chose for your Final Project and that you can use in your Final Project. You may use one of the primary sources (FOUND BELOW)listed this week, or you may find your own. Complete the “Analyzing Primary Sources” activity in Chapter 8, section 8.1 of your textbook to help you think about and understand your primary source.*Note: Remember that a primary source is an artifact or document created at the time of an event or by someone who personally witnessed the event. Please review the handouts, Types of Sources and Primary Sources.
Reflect Icon Reflect: Think about the changes and conflicts which defined the 1920s through the early 1940s. Consider the social changes that occurred in the 1920s, and how those changes affected the group that you chose for your Final Project. Consider the changes that the United States went through from the Great Depression through World War II. Reflect on the causes of the Great Depression and the New Deal programs of the Roosevelt Administration. Identify the event represented in your primary source. Think about what your source tells you about the event, and what it does not tell you. Think about how that event relates to your group, and to the larger transformations going on.Consult The Anatomy of a Discussion Board (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. as well as Critical Thinking: A Guide to Skillful Reasoning (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. as you formulate your response.
Write Icon Write: Based on information from your textbook and your analysis of the primary source you chose, answer the following:

  • What primary source did you choose and what event does it focus on?
  • Why was this event important, and how does it fit into the conflicts and changes of the 1920s?
  • What does your primary source tell you about the event? And what does it not tell you?
  • How does the event you chose relate to your Final Project topic?
  • The 1920s were a time of much prosperity for some groups in American Society until the Depression. How was your chosen group impacted by the Great Depression?
  • Provide an APA citation for your primary source. Here are some examples of APA citations (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Your initial post should be at least 250 words in length. Your post should make reference to the required materials with in-text citations. Your references and citations must be formatted according to APA style

Primary Sources For Week Three
Bliven, B. (1925, Sept. 9). Flapper Jane. New Republic. Retrieved from http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113130/bruce-bl…
A magazine article originally published in 1925 about flappers. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project.
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Hardenbergh, M. (1923, Aug. 12). Taking the hand off the cradle to catch devil fish: How modern woman is delving into the sacred precincts of male occupation and is now found in the role of bandit, judge, bricklayer, hunter, and race horse jokey. The Atlanta Constitution, 2-3. Retrieved from http://www.americainclass.org/sources/becomingmode… dernwoman.pdf
A newspaper article published in 1923 about women working in formerly all-male jobs. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project.
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Hartt, R. L. (1921, Jan. 15). “The new Negro”: “When he’s hit, he hits back!”. Independent, 76, 59-60. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5127
A newspaper article published in 1921 about a new determination among African Americans to achieve equality and respect. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project.
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Indian Thorpe greatest sport marvel of all time. (1922, Feb. 18). The Evening World. Retrieved from http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030193/…
A newspaper article published in 1922 about Jim Thorpe, a famous Native American athlete. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project.
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Marshall, C. C. (1927). Should a Catholic be president?: A contemporary view of the 1928 election. Atlantic Monthly, 139, 540-544, 548-549. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5074
A magazine article published in 1927 arguing that Catholic Americans’ first loyalty was to the Pope and not country, making them unacceptable for holding high public office. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project.
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McDougald, E. J. (1925). Elise Johnson McDonald on “The double task: The struggle of Negro women for sex and race emancipation”. In A. Locke (Ed.), The New Negro: An Interpretation. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5126
An essay published in 1925, discussing the challenges faced by African-American women in different economic groups. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project.
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Smith, E. D. (1924). “Shut the door”: A senator speaks for immigration restriction. Congressional Record, 65, 5961–5962. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5080
An excerpt from a congressional debate on the Immigration Act of 1924 that illustrates attitudes toward different groups of immigrants at that time. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project.
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U.S. v. Bhagat Singh Thind, 261 U.S. 204 (1923). Retrieved from Not all Caucasians are White: The supreme court rejects citizenship for Asian Indians http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5076
An excerpt from a Supreme Court ruling from 1923 in which the Justices ruled that only free whites could be US citizens. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project.
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